The British are most open to possible relationships between their children and people of Jewish nationality.

A Jewish person
Picture: Pixabay

EU residents are increasingly open to gender, ethnic or religious minorities – according to Eurobarometer research published in 2019. Poles are much less likely than average Europeans to accept same-sex relationships.

According to the survey, 69% of respondents would not mind if their child was in a relationship with a person of Jewish nationality. This is 9 percentage points more than in 2015.

The same level of tolerance applies to people with disabilities, with slightly less applying to Asians (68%) and black people (66% – 10 percentage points more than in 2015).

EU citizens are more open to relationships with people of different skin colour
Picture: Matheus Ferrero / Unsplash

Societies in which people are most open to possible relationships between their children and people of Jewish origin are British, where 87% of respondents said they would not mind such a relationship. The worst in this respect are Cypriots (36%) and residents of Romania (39%).

In Poland, 55% of respondents replied that they would not mind their child’s relationship with a Jew, which means that there has been an increase of 3% over the last four years.

Poland is below the EU average when it comes to tolerance for same-sex marriages.

Same-sex couple
Picture: Jana Sabeth / Unsplash

Just over half of Europeans (55%, an increase of 11 percentage points from 2015) would not mind if their child had a same-sex relationship. The greatest tolerance in this respect is in the Netherlands (89%) and Sweden (88%), and the smallest in Bulgaria (7%) and Lithuania (16%).

Poland is below the EU average with a result of 38%. Over the past four years, however, a lot has changed, as the number of those accepting such relationships has increased by 11 percentage points.

The change of attitude can also be seen in the answers to other questions. For 88% of Europeans (7 percentage points more than in 2015) it would not be a problem if a woman held the most important elected office in their country. The least open to such a scenario are Austrians (78%) and Romanians (71%).

Sanna Marin, Prime Minister of Finland
Picture: Laura Kotila

For 88% of Europeans, it would not be a problem if a woman held the most important office in their country.

Almost three-quarters (72%) of those surveyed would not be disturbed if a person with a different skin colour than the majority of the population in their country held the highest office, and for 64%, it could be a gay, lesbian or bisexual person (13 percentage points more than in 2015).

In Poland, 49% respondents declared openness to such a scenario – 2 percentage points more than in the previous survey.

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